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Cabbage Patch 10

I haven’t done a lot of running since the GNR, in fact I haven’t done any, beyond the occassional jog in the direction of a bus stop. Illness, DOMS, work and idleness have kept me away from running this autumn but yesterday was the Cabbage Patch 10 so I had to get out and see if I could remember the action.

The Cabbage Patch 10 is an event that I have been looking forward to for almost a year after hearing the race t-shirt was a sight to behold, it’s held fairly locally (Twickenham – Kingston – Richmond) and organised by the Stragglers running club.

After examining my splits for the GNR I decided to approach this 10-miler with a strict pacing strategy. I was aiming for a 2 hour finishing time, which was realistic yet stretching and therefore needed to keep at a 7:27 min/km pace. Again perfectly reasonable but I have to admit to doing my most of my long slow training runs at a slightly slower pace.

The start of the race was a little cramped, 1500 runners assembled into a small pedestrianised zone prior to being released onto the high street. I ended up caught somewhere in the middle as I assembled with OGB. Clearly the wrong spot for me, I need to be at the back, tucked nicely out of the way.

cabbagesplit Cabbage Patch 10

I ended up setting off well above my desired pace as I was trying not to make too much of an obstacle of myself. I dropped back down to 7:27 after the first km but maybe that early start affected my longevity. I don’t know what happened at the 6 km mark either, I think I had a few people underfoot and it seemed easier to just pass them. After that move I faded fast and although I kept pushing to increase my speed there just didn’t seem to be anything left in my legs.

I finished in 2:03 something (watch time) and 2:04:39 (officially), somewhat under target but not too surprising.

The marshalls were excellent – loads of them and all very cheery and vocal – much appreciated!

I will eventually issue a snap of the coveted race t-shirt but at the moment I’m sulking too much, and anyway its on its second trip around my washing machine, where I hope it will stretch. By the time I finished they had run out of large (and medium) sized t-shirts, which meant I had to make do with small. Now I understand that I if I’m going to make a habit of being almost the last over the line then I can’t complain if I don’t have much choice but at the same time, if I speed up a great deal it seems likely that I will have shed enough lard in the process to negate the need for choice anyway. Hey ho.

Now I’ve got a little repertoire of race distances under my belt, I’ve drawn up a chart comparing my actual race times with race predictions based on my 5 km pb, utilising the Purdy formula. The calculator for this is found on the brilliant runningfofitness website under predict race from race.

haddrequired Cabbage Patch 10

Not surprisingly it shows that I am underperforming as I increase my distance, an indication that I’m not fit enough for the higher distances. I’m interested in this as I read about it in a booklet on Hadd training, who advocates running at low heart rates as a means to increase aerobic efficiency. I’m going to give this a go in December, by then I will have switched work and will be able to run on an almost daily basis again – I can’t wait. Next year is going to be a good one for running.

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{ 6 comments… add one }

  • booyaa 16 October, 2007, 8:25 am

    Well done mate, I did the other race (Kingston 16). I was half expecting the two races to meet on opposite sides of Kingston Bridge.

    I went 20m slower than the April event (race report pending). It’s a bit far into teh future but do you fancy signing up for the 8.2 event (a single lap of the Kingston event) next April? Might just be the right distance between 10K and 10M.

    I like that predictive pace graph btw, Excel?

  • John 16 October, 2007, 12:51 pm

    Do what I do. ALWAYS start races right at the back – then you don’t get ‘carried away’ (not literally obviously) with the flow.

    Congratulations – what’s your next race?

    John

  • kathy 16 October, 2007, 1:40 pm

    Well done on your 10 miler. Glad to see you’re back out there running. Good luck with the t-shirt. I had a similar problem recently .. no larger t-shirts left by the time I went to collect mine.

  • XFR Bear 18 October, 2007, 10:01 pm

    Cabbage Patch is great – one of my fave events – I’ve got three of the shirts I think.

    if you do lose weight, there are always events like this: http://www.krispykremechallenge.com/index.php?page_id=3
    to help you put the weight back on so you fit into a large ;-)

    Hadd looks interesting – just be careful to maintain a decent gait – on RW a fair few people found they got injuries/niggles due to poor form when they tried to run slower.

    Have a look at the link on my blog to WIndsurfing Susie – she used Hadd stylee training and there’s some interesting stuff a bit back – it’s under Base training etc

  • No Wetsuit Girl 20 October, 2007, 2:18 pm

    Why are your predicted times plotted on a straight line? It would make sense that you would slow down as the distance gets longer. I think you’re right on track, chart be damned!

    Did I ever tell you that you’re the best blogger commenter ever, by the way? You always make me laugh and hurt my feelings at the same time. Keep ‘em coming!

  • Morph Review 5 July, 2010, 11:11 am

    I invariably tend to mull over things a bit harder about all sorts of things after I browse over somebody new’s blog and their particular posts. There sure is some wonderful “brain food” blogs out there and I sure do feel like I’ve had a decent helping here checking out your site. I essentially appeared here via Bing when I was first doing some web research for a bit of course work that I have. Always a pleasure browsing through and I’m hopeful that you’ll keep on writing new posts. Bye!

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