Personal Training Session – The Annihilation

Drinking Seal

I’ve been slacking on the barbell front and decided it was time to call in the assistance of weightlifting task master. I found someone local who used the term “beasting” when I enquired about his methods and so I promptly but nervously signed up for a few sessions.

Saturday was day 1 and I can confirm he was not lying about his methods. We moved through standard moves such as deadlifts, chest presses and dumbbell rows. I had my first go at rubber band assisted pull ups and finished with medicine ball slam downs which are now my all time favourite move. Some where in the middle I managed to destroy myself. I think it must have been somewhere near the 60th pushup and the first dodgy kettlebell swing.

By the time I left I couldn’t put my coat on and I struggled to lower myself into the car.

I knew I was pretty wrecked afterwards but I’ve been quite impressed by how shattered my arms are. I have severe DOMS in my triceps, the like of which I’ve never experienced in my upper body. I can’t dress and I struggle to drink because I can’t take my hands to my face. Quite odd.

Drinking SealThe hand to mouth movement has been seriously hindered but it is not going to prove itself to be an effective weightloss strategy as I have mastered a modified action. I discovered yesterday, that if I take my drinks in very long glasses, I can polish off a couple of pints without any problem. I may look like a drinking seal with my two handed action but at least I won’t die of dehydration.

The last time I worked my upper body this hard was during a weekend wii fit bowling session with Rach.

I could barely carry the weight of my own arms, I would yell out in pain every time I sent the ball bouncing towards her TV screen and even managed to pull my left hamstring as I adopted the power crouch position.

I felt the need for a full body cast then and it wouldn’t go amiss now. In the meantime I will have to continue setting Lynn’s alarm 15 mins early so she can help me put my work shirt on.

Revealing AutoImmunity

Hashimoto's blood results

I love collecting data, in fact if running didn’t lend itself so well to data collection and analysis I may well have made a different choice back in 2005 and taken up watching baseball instead.

I’ve jumped onto every method of self quantification since taking up the sport – gps, pace, heart rate, weight, body fat, blood pressure, pulse oximetry, almost all of which have required the purchase of some whizzy new gadgetry. So when I was offered the chance of looking a little deeper to understand my performance, or lack of it, I jumped at the chance.

Curoseven seem to be one of the few practices in the UK that offer functional blood testing for performance and recreational athletes. They have a fairly flexible approach and can provide a number of packages with a range of blood markers. I opted for the weight management package, just in case it revealed any top secret clues that could help me shift a few stone.

A standard performance screen would differ slightly but you would expect to see a variety of biochemistry and hormonal values reported against functional ranges (different to the disease ranges used by your GP) alongside a report that indicates any areas of concern along with recommendations that may include dietary, supplement and/or exercise advice. The tests are quite expensive, ranging from £299 – £599 but as yet I haven’t found a cheaper way to access my blood results.

Dr Tamsin Lewis (@sportiedoc) is one of the founders of Curoseven and as the Ironman UK Champion and medical doctor, she is appropriately qualified to advise on performance.

I was keen to set this first test up as a benchmark from which I could monitor changes in any future test, so I nipped into London to have my blood samples taken at an extremely efficient Harley Street clinic and was out again in about 15 mins.

Hashimoto's blood resultsThe results took about week but when they arrived I was rather surprised to discover that I’d acquired a disease. Apparently my immunology results revealed that I have an autoimmune disease called Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. My body is slowly attacking it’s own thyroid and not surprisingly this doesn’t help my performance.

I wasn’t really expecting that sort of news, although in retrospect I have been able to remember all sorts of symptoms and ailments that I can now pin on my new disease. The fact is, if I had not been fascinated by the thought of collecting my own blood data, I would not have found out about this for a long time.

The usual progression in Hashimoto’s is for the thyroid to be increasingly damaged by the bodies own immune system. It responds initially by working harder to produce thyroid hormones until eventually it can’t keep up and you go hypothyroid. I currently have very low level symptoms but my level of inertia would have meant my thyroid would have been pretty much eradicated before I decided to see the GP. Then I would have had to factor in further delays while they fathomed out what was up with me.

Thanks to this blood testing I now have the opportunity to research the condition and take action to hopefully prevent the decline in my function and possibly arrest the autoimmune response. As it happens, conventional medicine isn’t in any great rush to treat Hashimoto’s. They tend to ignore the autoimmune element and wait until the disease has wrecked your thyroid so they can top you up with replacement hormones.

I consider myself incredibly lucky to have been given the heads up on this. I must have been given months (possibly years) of a head start and I’m making the most of it by adjusting my diet to reduce the inflammatory response and I’m just about to go and get a second blood test to see if a month of going gluten free will have had any impact on my antibody levels.

Here starts a whole new world of n=1 experiments (aka self experimentation). I’ll document most of these on one of my other blogs: coolmoxie.com

How to Tape Your Feet for Blister Prevention

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Foot Taping for Long Distance WalksI’ve had some great results from pre-taping my feet prior to long hikes and can now walk around 40 miles, confident that I won’t get blisters. Even on this year’s London2Brighton challenge where the weather conditions were appalling and I ended up wearing two pairs of unfamiliar shoes, I managed 57km feeling physically broken but with my feet still intact – not a single blister.

My Blister Prevention Routine

  • Keep your feet in good nick – in the run up to your long walk you should keep your feet free of callouses and moisturise to prevent cracked skin.
  • Practice taping before your big event – there is a knack to applying tape so start practising early.
  • I apply tape to my own feet so I can flex while I’m applying it to make sure it is not too tight.
  • After taping, dust down with talcum powder to absorb any excess adhesive
  • Wear Bridgedale lining socks on top of the tape.
  • Put the hiking or running sock on next, being careful not to introduce creases.
  • During the event, change the lining socks regularly and check the the tape is still secure.

Zinc Oxide Tape for Blister Prevention

I’ve worked my way through a number of different brands of zinc oxide tape and have now settled on Leukotape P. I’ve found this to have excellent adhesive properties and a good degree of stretch. It somehow manages to avoid leaving adhesive on the non-sticky side of the tape, which is a big bonus and a problem I’ve noted with every other roll of tape I’ve tried.

Tape Adherent

A lot of guides suggest that you purchase an additional spray adhesive to apply to the foot before adding the tape. I’ve tried this technique but I’ve stopped using it because there is a fine balance between too little and too much stickiness. If you get a decent tape you shouldn’t need extra glue and you don’t want to have any extra adhesive on the outside of the tape as it will stick to your socks, increasing the chances of fabric folds under your feet. I apply a liberal sprinkling of talcum powder before I put on my socks as well.

Where to Apply the Anti Blister Tape

Ideally you will have slowly built up your long walks or runs and should now have a clear idea of where you tend to develop hot spots. When I first started training for 100km walks I would get blisters forming after only 10k when wearing hiking boots, and they would always be in the same place. Mine started under the heel and across the ball of my foot and for good measure, the back of my heel would regularly rub raw.

I chose the taping technique illustrated in the video below, as it covered all my weak points. If you develop hot spots in other places you may need to extend the covered regions.

Pre-Taping for Blister Prevention

  •  Start by applying anchor strips along the inner and outer sides of your foot.
  • Join the two anchor strips with a piece that goes across the heel.

Foot Taping for Blister Prevention

  • Start applying strips across the underside of your heel, with a slight overlap on each strip.
  • Be careful not to introduce creases and keep your foot flexed upward (dorsi-flexed) so that you don’t apply the tape too tightly.
  • Continue with more overlapped strips on the ball of your foot.
    Foot Taping for Blister Prevention
  • Finish by re-applying the anchor strips on either side of the foot.

Let me know how you get on……

The Firefly Recovery Device Review

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An invisible, yet relentless reflex hammer appears to be beating out a rhythm on my knees. Both legs are twitching, one then the other and back.

Firefly Recovery Device

I’m trialling a new running gadget, the Firefly Recovery Device which is designed to reduce lower leg DOMS in athletes and weekend warriors alike.

My weekend marathon across the London Underground network was tough on my legs. By the time I got home I was barely able to support my own weight and it was clear I’d be suffering for days on wobbly pins.

Time to unpack the Firefly Recovery Device.

The Firefly recovery device comes packed and sealed like a clinical instrument. Stripping open the foil pouch reveals a small strap with a raised button, presumably hiding a tiny battery. You peel off the plastic backing (make sure you keep this safe) and then apply the impressively sticky strap underneath your knee cap. There are detailed fitting instructions in the pack but I found the online video the most useful in ensuring optimum placement.

You are aiming to get the line of arrows over the head of your fibula, which is a knobble on the outside of your lower leg, just below the knee. I think the aim is to apply optimum neuromuscular electrical stimulation to the peroneal nerve, so if you don’t get the placement quite right you won’t feel the same kick. You can shift the device around a bit though so it’s not vital to get it right first time. The adhesive is strong and I’ve been whipping the device on and off quite a number of times so far.

You then press the button to switch the device on and it starts pulsing, you have a number of settings which you cycle through by pressing the button again and each increment increases the intensity. The effect isn’t painful but it is odd. I first noticed a slight twitching in one of the tendons of my right foot but as I moved the strap around and then increased the setting I got a very noticeable spasm in my leg. The video above illustrates the twitching I achieved – I have got my legs raised to accentuate the effect.

The Firefly is said to improve an athlete’s recovery by stimulating the muscles in the lower leg which increases blood flow and therefore accelerates the removal of metabolic waste products. It is claimed that it can reduce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 24 hours.

I didn’t conduct a particularly scientific test and chose not to leave one leg as an untreated control. As a result the outcome is highly subjective but I’m still going to claim it as positive. I wore the device for about 20 mins on two separate occasions. I was banned from wearing it in bed due to the lower limb convulsions but even my relatively brief adherence to the device resulted in noticeably less stiffness and I could just about summon up the energy for a 20 minute jog the next day. That was much better than I expected.

Although the Firefly is designed to be used to promote recovery after vigorous activity, I plan to use it for some mid-event recuperation. In less than two weeks time I’ll be embarking on a 100k hike – The London2Brighton Challenge. At the mid-way point there is a planned break for food and blister treatment but I will also be whipping out my Firefly devices to see if they can encourage my legs to go a bit further this year.

Although the Firefly is officially marketed as a disposable device it’s battery life is quoted to be 30 hours which will see me through quite a number of recovery sessions. The adhesive is quite capable of coping with a number of re-applications (especially if you remembered to keep the plastic backing) but you can also buy a Velcro knee strap which keeps the device very secure.

At £29 for a pair it is fairly pricey and I probably wouldn’t have considered it if it had been a once only unit. As it is I’m very excited to see how it fairs on the big day, if it can re-invigorate my legs after 50k I’ll be ordering a years supply.

Other notable reviews of the Firefly Device

Firefly Recovery Device

A Deep Need for Heat

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Deep Heat PatchDeep Heat sent me a selection of warming (and cooling) patches to trial and this weekend resulted in more than enough sore muscles to ease.

My motivation has a tendency to ebb more than it flows and so when I catch even the tiniest wave of sporting enthusiasm I’ve been doing my best to ride it. This weekend it meant cramming a weeks worth of exercise into 1 day.

Saturday started with BMF, so we were in the park by 9:30 shivering in a huddle as our Sergeant Major determined exactly how he was going to go about rubbing our faces in the mud. He opted for plank splits and monkey crawling up a sodden bank, interspersed with shuttle runs and partner shoving.

After a quick break for brunch I was off again for my final session of Olympic Weightlifting, wondering how the earlier military battering was going to interfere with my weighted squat performance.

I was noticeably wobbly from the start but after 90 mins of snatch and clean training I was ready to plonk myself on the floor and await a teleportation device. Unfortunately I still have a couple of 100k walks to train for so I had to forego any offers of space/time travel and actually walk home.

What a drag. Have I mentioned before that I find walking so incredibly tedious and mind numbingly dull? If it wasn’t for the invention of audiobooks I’d stand no chance. This week I’m listening to The Farm by Tom Rob Smith and it is sufficiently gripping to offer some pleasure with each passing mile.

Needless to say, when I woke up on Sunday there was no part of me that wouldn’t welcome the application of a Deep Heat patch. I’m hoping to keep a couple spare as light relief on the London2Brighton walk so wasn’t prepared to blow them all this weekend. I therefore wondered around for a couple of hours trying to decide which bit of me hurt the most.

I decided my deltoids were in greatest need and attempted to apply a medium patch. It didn’t want to curl very neatly around my shoulder so I whipped it off and slapped it on my ample quad. The off and on again application won’t have helped its adhesive powers but it seemed fairly secure despite a little peeling at the edges.

I then went about my day, hobbling and moaning every time I moved, making sure everyone was aware that I’d had a pretty tough weekend. Despite the melodrama I also managed a few hours on the allotment, performing light planting and sowing duties and the patch remained intact. In fact the patch stayed on for a good 10 hours, delivering a gentle warmth until I went out for a very unsuccessful jog/walk/crawl around the block. At the 2k mark I could feel the patch slipping as all the warm beads sunk downwards. At 2.5k the patch shot out from the bottom of my trousers and I had to retrieve it from the gutter.

I think thats a pretty successful test. The pack claims 8 hours of warmth and my patch remained in-situ for around 10 hours and was still giving off a faint afterglow even from the gutter. It was a bonus that I didn’t have to rip it and half a layer of epidermis from my thigh.

Product details:

Deep Heat Patch

Deep Heat Patch provides effective, warming relief from muscular aches and pains, joint stiffness and backaches for up to eight hours. Each patch contains iron and activated charcoal. When the pack is opened, the air activates a heat generating reaction that produces a warming effect when the patch is applied to the skin. This local, superficial heat improves the circulation to the muscles, so reducing pain and stiffness. Each Deep Heat Patch is active for up to eight hours after the pack is opened, providing long-lasting, deep-relieving warmth. With no smell and no associated grease, the self-adhesive patches are easy to apply and convenient for use during the day.

RRP for a single Deep Heat Heat Patch is £2.07; Boots.com
RRP for a pack of four patches is £6.25. Boots.com

The Ten Step Plan to escape the pain of Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis

There have been times over the last few years when I thought my running days were over. I’ve been so crippled by the pain of plantar fasciitis that I’ve had to use hiking poles to get into work and at it’s worst I’ve resorted to moving around the house on my hands and knees.

Plantar fasciitis is the curse of runners.

Most runners will be struck down by a running injury at some time in their life but few are as debilitating as plantar fasciitis. As a breed we have a tendency to push ourselves hard and increase volumes and intensity too far and too soon and usually combine the two for good measure. Overloading your body, running with inappropriate footwear and ignoring other aspects of your fitness such as core strength training and flexibility will unfortunately increase your chances of being struck by plantar fasciitis. Overweight runners are also more prone to overuse injuries such as plantar fasciitis.

So how do you know if your foot problem is caused by plantar fasciitis?

Plantar FasciitisTypically the pain is felt on the sole of your feet, around the fleshy part of your heel pad. I had it in both of my feet but more often it is restricted to one side. I described the pain as though I had a large pebble in both shoes, causing a pressure pain and a bruised sensation.

It was also associated with stiffness which was much worse after resting, so after waking in the morning I would find myself hobbling for the first few steps as my feet accustomed themselves to movement. It felt like I was walking on stumps rather than fully mobile and flexible feet. For a while I was able to run through the pain and suffer the consequences after I stopped but when I started increasing the intensity again, the walking sticks had to make a re-appearance and the enforced rest periods started again.

How to recover from plantar fasciitis.

I’ve been dealing with the injury for well over a two years and have worked my way through most of the advice available, some of which provided only limited success but I am pleased to announce that I am now pain free and back running and training for my marathon.

Here’s my ten step plan for achieving pain free running:

  1. Stop running. This sounds drastic but should only be necessary for a few days to a week to enable you to get through the acute stage of your injury.
  2. Start a 2-week course of ibuprofen or other suitable anti-inflammatory, 1 tablet three times a day should be sufficient. I wouldn’t normally advise medication, I very rarely take tablets but I have to admit that this was one of the most successful elements of my recovery plan. The injury is caused by inflammation of the plantar fascia that runs underneath the foot and a short course of anti-inflammatory medication along with a period of rest can be extremely effective in helping the foot recover.
  3. Ice your feet 2- 3 times daily. I did this by filling a small bottle with water and freezing it, you can then roll your feet over this to combine icing with a strong plantar fascia stretch. You may find it more convenient to soak your feet in a bucket of icy water.
  4. calf stretchBuild a stretching routine into your day. It is very likely that tight calves are part of the problem and if you have lower back pain as well you’ll probably find that your hamstrings are knotted up too. I stretch my calves while going up the escalators at the tube station, keeping the balls of my feet on the edge of the rise and dropping my heels. You can also do the standard runners stretch which involves you pushing against a tree or wall while applying gentle tension to the outstretched rear leg.
  5. Foot and calf strengthening – grasping golf balls with your toes is a great exercise for working out your feet and step raises are brilliant for strengthening the calves.
  6. The Stick and other methods of tortureMassage – foot and calf – I use The Stick which is a marvellous gadget for rolling out knots and tension but a foam roller would probably have a similar effect. I aim to do this before and after a run and find that the pre-run roll is most effective at ensuring that my calves don’t tighten up.
  7. Build core training and flexibility into your program – stretch daily and add in a core workout 3 times a week. A simple yoga routine such as the sun salutation repeated a few times will take less than 10 minutes a day and core routine needn’t necessarily take longer than 20 mins. I use an iPhone app for both routines but there are plenty of ideas on the web.
  8. Cross train. There is no need to cut out the aerobic exercise while you are on your enforced running rest, and in fact it is always good injury-proofing advice to maintain an element of cross training in your program. Try pool running if you really miss the running or cycling and swimming as great fitness alternatives.
  9. Experiment with insoles and consider replacing your shoes if they are worn. Running shoes have a shelf life depending on the distance run and the weight of the runner. If you have foot pain and your shoes have taken a battering it might be time to invest in a new pair. Insoles are worth considering if only as a temporary measure but you might need to seek professionally podiatry advice for this.
  10. Try the Paleo diet to relieve the pain of plantar fasciitis – I saved this one for last as it sounds a bit nuts. I started the Paleo diet a while ago for health and weightloss reasons and had absolutely no expectation that it would help my plantar fasciitis but by the end of the first week of sticking to the diet my foot pain had gone. I was surprised and didn’t actually draw the connection until I started researching the paleo diet and read in Loren Cordain’s Paleo Diet book, a case study which indicated that another dieter had found relief from plantar fasciitis after starting the paleo diet. The mode of action is likely to be anti-inflammatory and maybe more appealing to many than the ibuprofen option.

Other methods of treatment for plantar fasciitis:

  • Born to RunBarefoot running. Barefoot running has gained huge levels of support and is often cited as a potential cure for plantar fasciitis following the success of the amazing book “Born to Run”. I’ve done quite a bit of barefoot running or minimalist running using shoes such as Vibram fivefingers and the Softstar run amocs but I cannot wholeheartedly recommend that you throw away the cushioned support shoes you are used to. I’d love to be able to do that but my fear is that, if you are anything like me, you will go too fast and too far down the barefoot running route and increase your risk of running injuries. Barefoot running is not for the fainthearted. You need to strengthen your feet and calves and take the transition extremely slowly – so proceed with caution.
  • A Strasbourg sock can be an effective plantar fasciitis night splint, worn while you sleep. It forces your foot into a 90-degree angle in order to stretch out the plantar fascia and can provide some relief.

I hope this program helps you in the way it helped me. When you start running again start back slowly and maintain the stretching and strength elements built into your recovery plan, the aim is to remain strong and flexible and to build the running levels slowly.

It’s always tempting, following a little bit of success, to throw yourself back into the running with a rather heroic attitude, but you should resist. If you’ve had plantar fasciitis already then you are going to be prone to relapses and that is just not worth it. Progress slowly, keep stretching and roll out the muscles of your legs before and after each run – if you don’t have a handy masseuse on hand, try the DIY option and invest in The Stick.

Operation Surgical Spirit

Puncture Repair Kit

Grantham Canal at CotgraveThis weekend was going to be epic.

Mileage to the max plus a curry with Rach.

We ticked the curry off no bother, which just left the miles to deal with themselves. The plan was for Lynn to drop me close to the start of the Grantham canal which happens to be in Nottingham, she’d then drive off, spend an extremely long day with her mother and wait for me to pop out 33 miles later at the Grantham end.

I set off in fairly good spirits, a little hungover and a bit intimidated by the wiggly, windy road ahead but mostly #upforit.

I might have mentioned previously (here or here for example) that I haven’t been much taken with the concept of walking but the long distance trail really does appeal to me. Cutting swathes across the countryside leaving a breadcrumb or GPS trail that would actually show up an aerial shot of the UK is rather satisfying.

Grantham Canal - with actual waterThe Grantham canal seems to be a lesser spotted variety of long distance trail. There was a tiny stretch where I was assailed by manic dogs and a couple of joggers but mostly I was alone, admiring the birds and longing, longingly for a bench to appear. It deserves to be more popular and I recommend it to anyone in search of a peaceful walk/bike/run through the lush lincolnshire countryside.

The pubs are a little sparse though and I missed the planned stop at Hose where I was supposed to meet my folks for a burger and Stella shandy. Hose has the greatest concentration of Grantham canal ale houses but it has an inconsequential bridge (n0 39) that is easy to pass, make a note of it if you want to complete the route in style as you’ll need to exit the towpath and head right in search of the Rose and Crown.

This map from the Grantham Canal Society is worth reviewing.

Grantham Canal

I did meet my mum and dad and they ferried me off for a cup a tea, a bacon butty and supplied me with emergency plasters for a pair of evil blisters starting to burn on both of my heels. They then joined me for a short stroll, timed to perfection with a peculiar hailstorm.

The blisters started at mile 8 so the moment I found a bench I whipped off my socks and changed them for my spare pair which unfortunately felt like a sisal door mat. I was limping by lunchtime, then the plasters offered some relief for a few miles.

Collapsed by Grantham CanalFrom mile 18 onwards I was completely taken over by the pain from my blisters. It is amazing how crippling an inch long bubble of tissue fluid can be. I tried everything available to me – switching socks again, having another fruit sherbert, re-applying plasters, walking barefoot and then I laid down. That was marvellously effective. It was so warm and peaceful and I could have stayed there all afternoon. I very nearly had to as well, it was a complete bugger to get back up again and my poles are no use under 16 stone (+) pressure – they just concertina back to packed size.

I did make it back to vertical without pitching myself into the canal and the hobbling continued, one bench to the next.

Despite all the support from the facebook sidelines I decided at 22 miles that I ought to save the crippling heroics for the big London2Brighton day and so called for my carriage home.

It had felt quite important to get this 30-miler under my belt. I’ve been incredibly concerned about my ability to complete the 100k route and this half distance trek would have given me a psychological boost. I still feel fairly positive though. My feet let me down but I was mentally strong and the rest of the body is willing.

Puncture Repair KitI need to go away, reassess footwear, buy lining socks, compeed, heavy duty zinc tape and embark on a twice daily application of surgical spirit. I might even consider some Nightgear Military Magnum boots to go with my military twin layer socks.

It’s easily going to be the hardest challenge I’ve ever set myself. Driving back to London last night after a warm bath and a roast chicken dinner I was aware that if I were doing the 100k I would still be walking – barely half way to Brighton, easing my painful feet into bed at midnight I would still be walking and when the darn cat woke me at 7 am, I’d still be walking/crawling into Brighton.

If any of you would like to donate to the Samaritans on the back of my painful London2Brighton attempt I’d be very grateful – here’s the link.

GPX of the full canal available here.

The Bedroom Scene

The Bedroom Scene

I haven’t exactly gone into hibernation but I may as well have done for all the running that has happened over the last couple of months.

I think the bedroom scene explains the situation:

Somewhere between the Great North Run and home I developed a niggle, just a minor dead leg feeling during a long run, then over the weeks it developed into a twinge and then shifted from my thigh to my hip to my calf and then for good luck decided to start throbbing in my knee.

After two weeks of rest but very little recuperation I brought out the big daddy of physio tools – the Rumble Roller. I braved the weapon of torture for two days, squealing my body over its vicious nobbles but have now lost my nerve and give it a wide berth when I hobble out of bed in a morning.

I’ve got til March to sort myself out as I’m booked into the Hastings Half and that doesn’t look like a route to drag a dead leg up.

Dry Bones

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I’ve had an incredibly low mileage week, peaking at a singular 6km run.

20111205-212420.jpgI blame lasts weekend’s heroic efforts across the farmlands of Lincolnshire which have left me somewhat infirm. My every waking movement has felt jarring, as though the cartilage has disintegrated from my knees and I’m down to bone on bone action.

I’ve just read a quote in Hal Higdon’s “Marathon: The Ultimate Training Guide” that fits the bill and neatly explains the dangers of rapidly increasing your mileage.

When I’m out of shape and I race long distances, everything hurts. It feels like my connective tissues are coming apart. But when I’m ready for a marathon and have put in the miles, everything moves smoothly.

I’m looking forward to smooth.

Custom Insoles from Profeet Fulham

Profeet Insoles

Profeet is a custom insole, gait analysis and specialist footwear shop based in Fulham and as they have a marathon sponsorship package running at the moment I thought I would invest in their top of the range 3D analysis service and bag £20 for the Samaritans.

Profeet foot strike

The shop was bustling and seemed to be set up like a swanky gents barbers with it’s leather armchairs and one on one service.

Steve took me through the routine starting with a few treadmill runs alternating between my existing shoe and short barefoot jogs. Then I ran along a track landing on a pressure pad which displayed a moving hotspot as my foot moved through heel strike to toe off. I was fascinated to see that I had a normal arch – I’ve always felt that I’ve been as flat-footed as they come, but nope, I have normal feet.

Steve’s initial shoe suggestion was for a neutral shoe with some minor cushioning but after trying on ten different pairs of shoes with ever increasing stability elements, we finally arrived back at the shoe I came in with – the Asics Gel Kayano 17, a heavyweight in the stability running shoe arena. It was only then that video gait analysis showed a stable foot without excessive movement through the heel.

Having settled on shoe we moved on to the insole formation, which was quite a pleasant experience involving warm foam and a little sit down with a cup of tea.

An hour and quite a bit of running later, I’m ready to leave the shop with my frighteningly white shoes, chunky insoles and very much lighter wallet. I hope they are good for my feet – I’ve had some considerable success with my plantar fasciitis recovery program but I’ve been keen to play things safely as I gradually ramp up the training runs. I’m up to 5k individual runs now so I’ll soon be ready to knock out some proper distance runs and put the custom insoles to the challenge.